Guest post: The fear, the guilt and the irrational thoughts

Elaine is the partner of the author of this blog. You can read Elaine’s other guest posts on the tagged page.

This entry is about the period after diagnosis when the initial shock is starting to wear off and the fear, guilt and crazies start to creep in.

The Fear

The aggressive onset of Laurna’s initial symptoms made me fear for her and how much further her condition would deteriorate. Within a year, she had gone from having no symptoms to having regular tsosis, speech slurring, difficulty swallowing and weakened limbs. Google was a terrifying place with its doom and gloom articles and pictures. I have never been a particularly creative person but during that time, I dreamed up every scenario possible (and even those that were impossible and frankly ridiculous).

Selfishly, I feared that Laurna would want space after her diagnosis and maybe break up with me. As it turned out, Laurna did need space to figure things out but thankfully not in the way I was worried about. I had to learn to be patient and accept that I can’t ‘fix’ everything. Looking back, I have always really appreciated how patient Laurna was with me learning to be patient!

The Guilt

I am sure lots of partners can relate to this but put simply – ‘It Should Have Been Me’. I just felt guilty. I felt guilty for having fears. I felt guilty for feeling guilty. Laurna had Myasthenia and I couldn’t take it from her or even share some of the load. 

Laurna has always been so active and it seemed a particularly cruel thing for such an energetic person to get. It left me feeling very helpless for quite a while. Ultimately, this kind of thinking doesn’t help you and it doesn’t help your partner. I tried to focus on the things that I could do rather than what I couldn’t do and I found that helped a lot. 

The Irrational Thoughts

I know it’s different for everyone but my brain turned into a tumble drier of questions, thoughts, doubts, concerns, ideas and plans.

How did I feel about Laurna’s diagnosis? What did it mean for her? What did it mean for me? How much training would it take to be able to run every marathon ever organised and raise thousands of pounds for research? What impact would it have if we wanted to have children in the future? Was I going to give up my career to look after Laurna? On second thoughts, I could never give up my career because I may have to support the both of us? What if I retrained as a scientist and single handedly developed a cure – can’t be that hard, right? Am I really the right person to deal with this….

As you can see, I went from having a total crisis of confidence to being overly exuberant in wanting to defeat Myasthenia. There was also a lot of fear driven hypothesising and general concern for the future. I worried what people would think if I shared my doubts or concerns and so they remained largely unspoken. 

I now understand that it is important to engage with the unspoken and feel more comfortable allowing myself to feel whatever it is that I feel. Sometimes ‘unspoken’ thoughts are there to protect you – there can be a nugget of value in the middle of the madness.

Conclusion

I’m not really sure when the ‘fear, guilt and crazy’ stage ended. It all just phased out as we ‘got on with stuff’. The main thing I would take away is to be kind to yourself and to each other. It is a complex phase to navigate and requires patience, empathy and communication. It’s when your support team can really help too. 

The priority is the person with the Myasthenia who has much more to deal with than you in this moment. If you feel that this phase is getting in the way of your support or your relationship, there are lots of options available. Counselling is always a good place to start and the Myaware charity (amongst others) has great resources including a counsellor and support groups. Just remember you’re not alone.

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