Travelling and myasthenia gravis

I’m back in Scotland after travelling around south east Asia with my wife Elaine and I have one thing to say to you: long term travelling is possible with a condition like MG. But more about that later. Over the three months, we spent time in seven countries:

  • Nepal
  • Thailand
  • Vietnam
  • Cambodia
  • Singapore
  • Indonesia
  • Laos

Although many of the countries were neighbours, they were very different culturally and politically which meant there were big differences in how developed they were and, as a result, what the medical facilities were like. The last point would not be a consideration for many of the travellers we met along the way, but Elaine and I were constantly aware of how likely we would be to survive a hospital trip if it was required.

During my time in Thailand, our second country, I made a decision – that blogging about the trip was getting in the way of my ability to be in the moment. Often we only had a few days to truly immerse ourselves and I didn’t want to spend that time doing the reflecting that I felt might be more meaningful from a distance. So I stopped, hoping that I’d have a few things to say once back in Scotland.

Now that I’ve had time to process it all, I’ll cover different topics that came up during the journey over the next few blogs. I’ll be posting these between now and when Elaine and I head over to South America at the end of January for our final three month stint.

For now though I want to say loud and clear; travelling for an extended period is do-able for someone with myasthenia gravis (MG). I repeat, it is do-able because I definitely have MG and I’ve returned from three months away happy and healthy. Saying this, I had the go ahead from my consultant after coming off the drugs that suppressed my immune system and getting all the relevant injections. I would NOT suggest trying it unless you can get the same thumbs up from a medical expert.

Naturally, I was nervous about how I would cope and while I was planning I couldn’t find anyone with MG saying you can do this. But as travelling for an extended period to far flung continents has been a dream of mine since long before I was diagnosed with MG, I had to try. And I knew it was important to try while I was feeling healthy and strong as with this condition nothing is guaranteed.

Fine, I had to adapt my dream: from a solid year of backpacking down to two three month periods because I am still taking medication (prednisolone) and that’s the longest prescription I could get. I also won’t be able to go to any areas with yellow fever in South America (the Amazon for instance) because I can’t get the yellow fever jab as it’s a live vaccine.

Although it’s cost us more money to go and come back home and then go again, it’s given me time to catch up with loved ones, get blood tests done to make sure I’m really doing ok, to sleep in the same bed for more than three nights in a row and to recover my strength before the next leg.

I already know it’s the best thing I’ve ever done and may ever do. Don’t get me wrong: there were hard days and times when I wished I was back in the safety of my pest-free and tropical disease-free flat by the seaside. But then there were days when I felt more alive than ever before; like when we snorkelled with wild turtles in Indonesia and spent the day looking after rescued elephants in northern Thailand. These two things alone were worth every possible risk and will stay with me for as long as I live.

A photo taken on our rented Go Pro off the coast of Gili Meno, Indonesia.

So if there’s one big takeaway for me, challenge your I cants and be willing to adapt your plans to make them fit with your MG or whatever it is that you’re struggling through. There may be a way of making your dream come true if you’re flexible and brave.

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