Trekking in the Himalayas 

After a couple of days rest in beautiful Pokhara, I can hardly believe what the last week has entailed and how well my body has coped. 

When we decided to go to Nepal, we initially signed up for the Annapurna Circuit trek. This is an 18 day trek with 11 days of walking. However, neither of us have been above 3000m (the level that altitude starts to impact most people) before and the circuit trek reaches over 5000m. Our initial excitement was replaced by last minute panic, as I had no idea how much impact the lack of oxygen would have on my MG and the only option from some of the places along the way was to be helicoptered out. So we changed to a 6 day trek below 3000m – with equally stunning views and daily yoga sessions. 

Elaine and I joined a group of 4 lovely women to trek through squelching jungles and up the 2500m Panachassee mountain (Nepalis consider this a hill). Our daily schedule was a morning yoga class, a hike, an evening stretching session when we reached our destination and an hour of relaxation – mostly with the soothing singing bowl.


The Buddhist temple at the Panachassee summit.

How it went

Between the strength-based yoga sessions and the daily step count, I was nervous about how my body would handle its first challenge in an alien ecosystem. The walking wasn’t too strenuous – we spent between 3 and 7 hours walking each day. However we were battling a relentless sun, post-Monsoon season boggy ground, leeches, steep upward and downward ‘paths’, jungle insects, lots of creepy crawlies in our rooms at night, and, on one day, the heaviest rain I’ve ever had the pleasure of walking in (says something considering I’m used to walking in Scotland). 

The group also collectively battled a lack of sleep – from 2 nights before the trek I managed only broken sleep and this continued right through to day 3 of the trek. Because we were tired each night, we all wondered whether there was less oxygen above 2000m and whether this was impacting our zzzz time?! 


Our rustic accommodation in Bhadure.

Coping with sleeplessness

After another restless first night of the trek, I decided to double my steroid dose and take a pyridostigmine just in case. I only did that for one day as I felt strong and healthy during the other days.

When it came after 4 horrible nights, 6 hours of solid sleep left me jumping out of bed to embrace the day. I’ve never felt better than during the yoga session that morning in Bhanyajang – watching the Annapurna range appear and disappear behind the clouds and feeling like I could hold the poses for hours.

While it was psychologically challenging, the lack of sleep didn’t challenge my body as much as I expected. In fact, I’ve rarely felt better than during those five days of circadian rhythm and healthy eating. 

Back to basics

The accommodation was rustic, with Nepali rather than western toilets (essentially a tiled hole in the ground), cold water, no electricity for part of the trek due to thunder storms and, shock horror, no internet. However I adapted quickly and was a little upset when the electricity returned. Saying that, I was so grateful for a bucket of hot water during my last night in Bhanyajang that a few moans escaped as I tipped the water over my head and felt my tired muscles relax.



Our toilet in Bhanyajang.

All good things must come to an end

We watched the landscape change from a quaint mountain village with locals lounging and Tibetan women selling bright jewellery to woodland paths; from dusty tracks to open hillsides; from endless stone steps to dense jungle full of mutlicoloured butterflies; from fields of buffalo grazing to hilltop temples in the mist; from ridges with endless mountains in the distance and eagles swooping to rice and millet fields lit up by the warm afternoon sun. Finally we found ourselves back in a different village in the throws of Dashain celebrations – giant swings are made out of bamboo and bright coloured decorations on the streets.

By our 6th early morning of yoga back in Pokhara, my body was tired and I felt fatigued as we travelled to our new hotel. But taking a nap right away followed by a couple of rest days helped my recharge and I found myself back on my brand new yoga mat two days later.

Having loved Panachassee trek, I’m determined to try a longer, more challenging trek in the incredible Himalayas (with some kind of sleep remedy in my first aid kit). We’re likely to be above altitude in South America for a short time so it’ll be a good test to see how my body responds. Hopefully I’ll be able to tackle the Annapurna Circuit or something similar in the future as the thought of spending triple the amount of time out in that beautiful countryside fills me with pure joy. 


Walking through rice fields on our last day of trekking.

One thought on “Trekking in the Himalayas ”

  1. thank you for sharing this wonderful journey with everyone – you are one courageous girl. I admire you both so much and will enjoy reading your blogs. Be well – hugs, Cathy xx

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