Going to hospital in Buenos Aires

After a frustrating discussion with travel insurance as I wrote about in the previous blog, I went to a Buenos Aires’ hospital to get help for my increased myasthenia symptoms.

As you can imagine, going to a hospital in a country where you only speak ‘un pocito’ of the language was frightening. I don’t think I’ve ever had such rapid deterioration and I had no idea of how to explain this or even if they would know of the condition.

Luckily, we found a private hospital where they had staff who could speak English. We went to the emergency waiting room thinking we should follow the same process as at home, but we were quickly redirected to the neurology clinic. The receptionists, although baffled by our ‘Spanglish’, were quickly able to establish that I needed a translator. Because it was so late in the day after all the messing around with the travel insurance, the translator had left however one of the staff members spoke enough English to help us.

Less than an hour after arriving, I was sitting in front of an empathetic neurologist who was telling me to relax and that I was in safe hands. My condition was explored and my symptoms documented – then the normal tests of muscle strength were carried out for the whole body (holding legs up, pressing up with arms, scrunching up facial muscles etc etc). The checks were more thorough than any I’ve had at home.

Having established that the flare up was only affecting my vision in terms of muscle strength, I was taken for blood and urine tests. The final tests were from a lung doctor to test if my breathing had been impacted. That was an interesting experience and not one I have had before – blowing as hard as you can into a piece of equipment like a breathalyser is bloody difficult. It gave me a lot of sympathy for anyone with asthma as apparently they have to do these tests regularly.

Finally I was asked to go back to speak to the neurologist. She was able to tell me within two hours of doing them that I didn’t have an infection and then we worked out a plan for my treatment.

The doctor prescribed me to increase my steroids to 10mg a day and two mestinons a day. If this had been in Scotland, I would have been disappointed to be jumping back up on the steroids. But when I was handed the prescription, I felt such a relief that I could have cried. I probably would have if I wasn’t so exhausted – by this point I could hardly keep my eyes open. And that night, for the first time in almost a week, I slept right through and woke up feeling a hundred times better.

I returned to the hospital for check ups after this and was given the same level of excellent care and support. Not only that but when I left, I was told if I needed anything to get back in touch and given the names of neurologists in the next place I was going.

While I know I was lucky to be near a capital city like Buenos Aires when this happened, I was very impressed by both the standard of care and the cost of the treatments. It may have been my travel nightmare up until the hospital, but as soon as I was in that neurologist’s consultation room I felt in safe hands.

The picture for this blog was taken outside Manzana de las Luces in Buenos Aires where I did a tango class a few days after the increased meds kicked in. Since those few days at the hospital, it’s been back to having fun and trying new things!

4 thoughts on “Going to hospital in Buenos Aires”

  1. Omg this is one of my fears too as I have been traveling. You have given me hope. I have all these tests done all the time however since I have full blown MG with the blowing tests.
    I am just glad you were able to spring right back and carry on. I love the resilience! 😉💗

    1. I do think it’s sensible to be cautious regarding this as I’m under no illusion that I was lucky with where I was at the time it happened – it could have been different if I was somewhere more rural, remote etc. But yeah on this occasion I’ve been lucky to be able to recover quickly and get a high standard of medical care 😊

  2. Hope you feel better about the rest of your travels and you’re able to enjoy the remainder of the adventure. Good luck!

    Also, interesting to hear about the standards of care elsewhere in the world….

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